Green Valley Stake

Not an official Church publication. (disclaimer)

Emergency Preparedness
website & portal


jhgjhgjhgk

 

- member household plan -

image of family making plan

Self/Family Responsibility
General Instructions:

(source: LDS Emergency Preparedness
Manual page 20)

member household minimum requirements
make kit seal image have plan seal link stay informed link

 


1. take care of your household first!

  • You, personally, should have a plan!
  • At a minimum, each member should complete the basic items below.
  1. make a kit

  2. have a plan

  3. stay informed

Every member's plan should include, at a minimum, the three basic plan items above. Additionally, every member can benefit from merging household emergency preparedness plans with their ward and stake plan.

The ward emergency preparedness plan covers the following five (5) main areas:


 

LDS
church
resources

quail ridge ward
procedures
question mark link

fema &
other
resources

step 1:
identify likely disasters


step 2:
gather information


step 3:
assignments & procedures


step 4: communication methods


step 5: member participation

ward planning guide pdf

The Quail Ridge Ward Emergency Preparedness Plan consists of five (5) main steps listed below. Place your mouse over each step to learn more.

step 1: indentify potential disasters:

List the disasters (natural or man-made) that are most likely to occur in your area. For each type of disaster, identify specific response actions that would be needed. (For example: In a disaster that can damage homes—such as an earthquake, fire, flood, or hurricane—a key action would be to find temporary shelter for displaced families.)

step 2: gather critical information:

Compile and maintain the following information:

  • Contact data for all members and missionaries living within stake or ward boundaries.
  • A map of the area, including the locations of member and missionary residences.
  • A list of members with special needs, such as the disabled and the elderly.
  • A list of members with equipment or skills (such as medical or emergency response training) that would be critical in a disaster.
  • Contact information for public safety agencies (e.g., police, fire, medical).
  • Contact information for community organizations (e.g., the Red Cross or Red Crescent) that provide emergency services, such as food, shelter, and medical care.
  • Contact information for area welfare leaders and, where available, local Church welfare operations.

step 3: assignments and procedures:

Plan how the council will organize and carry out each of the tasks listed below, identifying who will be responsible for each and what procedures they will follow. Designate a primary and an alternate central location where council members will gather after an emergency to direct relief efforts.

Prior to a disaster:

  • Develop working relationships with civil authorities and other community relief organizations. Immediately after a disaster
  • Determine and report the condition of members and missionaries. Reports on member needs generally come from home teachers to quorum leaders, who then report them to the bishop. Bishops, in turn, report them to the stake president.
  • Help to locate and reunite family members who have become separated.
  • Obtain medical care for those who have been injured or who have other health challenges.
  • Coordinate response efforts with civil authorities and community relief organizations.
  • Assess needs and arrange for the supply of basic provisions and services—such as food, temporary shelter, sanittation, and clothing—for members and others. Area welfare leaders and, where available, Church welfare operations can be called upon to assist with provisions and services.
  • Determine and report the condition of Church buildings and property. In the period following a disaster
  • Provide assistance to members who have suffered damage to homes or belongings, emotional trauma, or loss of livelihood.
  • Work with civil authorities and relief organizations to identify and respond to opportunities for the Church to assist with community needs.

step 4: emergency communication methods:

A smiling family with a pet in their backyardYour family may not be together when disaster strikes, so plan how you will contact one another. Think about how you will communicate in different situations.

Complete a contact card for each adult family member. Have them keep these cards handy in a wallet, purse or briefcase, etc. Additionally, complete contact cards for each child in your family. Put the cards in their backpacks or book bags.

Check with your children’s day care or school. Facilities designed for children should include identification planning as part of their emergency plans.

Family Communication Tips

Identify a contact such as a friend or relative who lives out-of-state for household members to notify they are safe. It may be easier to make a long-distance phone call than to call across town, so an out-of-town contact may be in a better position to communicate among separated family members.

Be sure every member of your family knows the phone number and has a cell phone, coins or a prepaid phone card to call the emergency contact. If you have a cell phone, program that person(s) as "ICE" (In Case of Emergency) in your phone. If you are in an accident, emergency personnel will often check your ICE listings in order to get a hold of someone you know. Make sure to tell your family and friends that you’ve listed them as emergency contacts.

Teach family members how to use text messaging (also known as SMS or Short Message Service). Text messages can often get around network disruptions when a phone call might not be able to get through.

Subscribe to alert services. Many communities now have systems that will send instant text alerts or e-mails to let you know about bad weather, road closings, local emergencies, etc. Sign up by visiting your local Office of Emergency Management web site.

Identify and plan for alternative communication methods that can be used in case phone lines, cellular phone service, or vehicle transportation routes are disrupted during a disaster. Such methods may include:

  • Internet communications (including e-mail, social media, and Internet telephony).
  • Text messaging via cellular phone (which may be available even if voice service is not).
  • Amateur radio.
  • Personal contact via foot, bicycle, etc. (Full-time missionaries can also help.)
  • As needed, priesthood leaders may call members of their units to be communication specialists. Qualified specialists often own communications equipment and possess valuable experience.

step 5: encourage member participation:

Regularly encourage members to engage in preparedness efforts and to follow the counsel outlined in the pamphlets:

  • All Is Safely Gathered In: Family Home Storage (04008) and
  • All Is Safely Gathered In: Family Finances (04007).
  • Channels for doing this might include:
    • Quorum and Relief Society meetings.
    • Sacrament meeting or stake conference talks.
    • Home and visiting teaching messages

Regularly encourage members to engage in preparedness efforts and to follow the counsel outlined in the pamphlets:

  • All Is Safely Gathered In: Family Home Storage (04008) and
  • All Is Safely Gathered In: Family Finances (04007).
  • Channels for doing this might include:
    • Quorum and Relief Society meetings.
    • Sacrament meeting or stake conference talks.
    • Home and visiting teaching messages.

Identify and plan for alternative communication methods that can be used in case phone lines, cellular phone service, or vehicle transportation routes are disrupted during a disaster. Such methods may include:

  • Internet communications (including e-mail, social media, and Internet telephony).
  • Text messaging via cellular phone (which may be available even if voice service is not).
  • Amateur radio.
  • Personal contact via foot, bicycle, etc. (Full-time missionaries can also help.)
  • As needed, priesthood leaders may call members of their units to be communication specialists. Qualified specialists often own communications equipment and possess valuable experience.

Plan how the council will organize and carry out each of the tasks listed below, identifying who will be responsible for each and what procedures they will follow. Designate a primary and an alternate central location where council members will gather after an emergency to direct relief efforts.

Prior to a disaster:

  • Develop working relationships with civil authorities and other community relief organizations. Immediately after a disaster
  • Determine and report the condition of members and missionaries. Reports on member needs generally come from home teachers to quorum leaders, who then report them to the bishop. Bishops, in turn, report them to the stake president.
  • Help to locate and reunite family members who have become separated.
  • Obtain medical care for those who have been injured or who have other health challenges.
  • Coordinate response efforts with civil authorities and community relief organizations.
  • Assess needs and arrange for the supply of basic provisions and services—such as food, temporary shelter, sanittation, and clothing—for members and others. Area welfare leaders and, where available, Church welfare operations can be called upon to assist with provisions and services.
  • Determine and report the condition of Church buildings and property. In the period following a disaster
  • Provide assistance to members who have suffered damage to homes or belongings, emotional trauma, or loss of livelihood.
  • Work with civil authorities and relief organizations to identify and respond to opportunities for the Church to assist with community needs.

Compile and maintain the following information:

  • Contact data for all members and missionaries living within stake or ward boundaries.
  • A map of the area, including the locations of member and missionary residences.
  • A list of members with special needs, such as the disabled and the elderly.
  • A list of members with equipment or skills (such as medical or emergency response training) that would be critical in a disaster.
  • Contact information for public safety agencies (e.g., police, fire, medical).
  • Contact information for community organizations (e.g., the Red Cross or Red Crescent) that provide emergency services, such as food, shelter, and medical care.
  • Contact information for area welfare leaders and, where available, local Church welfare operations.
List the disasters (natural or man-made) that are most likely to occur in your area. For each type of disaster, identify specific response actions that would be needed. (For example: In a disaster that can damage homes—such as an earthquake, fire, flood, or hurricane—a key action would be to find temporary shelter for displaced families.)

 

 

Join Our Mailing List

join button

 


blue survey button image


sample household
preparedness manual
(500 pages)

manual image
not an official church document


 

video channel

 
 

 

 

 

quail ridge ward - provident living & emergency preparedness website